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Welding Cable Price: Full Chart Breakdown For Welding Cable Prices Sold By The Foot

June 17, 2020

The welding cable price can be affected by many different things such as the length of the cable, the voltage, amperage, quality, and manufacturer. Welcome to the ultimate guide on welding cable prices. We'll cover the most important information such as average price, price per spool, premium cable price, and more. Welding cables are sold by the foot which allows you to save money by getting the exact size you need.

 

· Example: If the cable price is $2.2/f and you order 140 feet, you'll pay a total of $308 for the cable. There are also cables sold in exact spools such as 100 feet, 250 feet, and 1000 feet. Welding cables are used for professional welding purposes as welding leads; occasionally they are used to power essential welding tools and applications not exceeding 600V. ZW Cable is the world's largest welding cable manufacturer and we provide dozen of different welding cables that differ in size, performance, and colors. Start by browsing our catalog of welding cables. ZW Cable's welding cables provide superior insulation, flexibility, and longevity. Our cables are designed to withstand prolonged use at high heat and provide the ultimate protection for welders.

 

What Affects The Price Of Welding Cables?

 

If welding cables are more expensive than regular cables, what justifies the price difference? The answer: They serve as a conductor for the welding current. The welding cable consists of a number of fine copper strands located inside the "jacket" (protective coating of the cable - usually made of rubber in different colors). The fine copper strands located in the interior of a welding cable provide a lot more flexibility compared to other electric conductors which could be used for welding purposes. The protective coating of the welding cable is more heat-resistant, sometimes up to 200°C. The jacket is designed to withstand high impact and movement over rough surfaces in the workshop.

 

As a rule of thumb, when the current level increases (usually marked in AMP), the welding cable's diameter and the cross-section area of the stranding has to increases. Imagine the copper wire similar to a water hose you use at home: You use a small hose to water the lawn/garden, while the fire department uses a large hose to fight fires. This is why you need a larger diameter for welding in order to carry the higher electric load. Hence, the price of welding cables is higher.

 

Average Price Of Welding Cables: Full Chart Breakdown

Welding cables are sold by the foot. To estimate how much you'll end up paying for your cable, do the math on the exact length you need and multiply it by the average price per foot. The price varies based on the amperage of the welding cable. The following is a breakdown of the average prices of welding cables based on size:

· Average price of 6 AWG welding cable: $0.6 per foot

.welding cable price Average price of 4 AWG welding cable: $0.9 per foot.

· Average price of 2 AWG welding cable: $1.3 per foot.

· Average price of 1 AWG welding cable: $1.7 per foot.

· Average price of 1/0 AWG welding cable: $2.2 per foot.

· Average price of 2/0 AWG welding cable: $2.7 per foot.

· Average price of 3/0 AWG welding cable: $3.5 per foot.

· Average price of 4/0 AWG welding cable: $4.1 per foot.

· Average price of 250 MCM welding cable: $6 per foot.

· Average price of 350 MCM welding cable: $8 per foot.

· Average price of 500 MCM welding cable: $10 per foot.

 

Prices Of Welding Cables Sold By The Spool

Depending on the manufacturer, the welding cables can be sold by the spool. These are "pre-cut" cables that you can use right away or cut on your own. The average length is between 250-1000 feet. Here's a breakdown of the average price to expect:

· Average price of 6 AWG (250 ft., 500 ft., or 1000 ft., spool) welding cable: $0.6 per foot.

· Average price of 4 AWG (250 ft., 500 ft., or 1000 ft., spool) welding cable: $0.7 per foot.

· Average price of 2 AWG (250 ft., 500 ft., or 1000 ft., spool) welding cable: $1.2 per foot.

welding cable

· Average price of 1 AWG (250 ft., 500 ft., or 1000 ft., spool) welding cable: $1.5 per foot.

· Average price of 1/0 AWG (250 ft., 500 ft., or 1000 ft., spool) welding cable: $1.9 per foot

· Average price of 2/0 AWG (250 ft., 500 ft., or 1000 ft., spool) welding cable: $2.4 per foot.

· Average price of 3/0 AWG (250 ft., 500 ft., or 1000 ft., spool) welding cable: $3 per foot.

· Average price of 4/0 AWG (250 ft., 500 ft., or 1000 ft., spool) welding cable: $3.7 per foot.

 

Price Of Premium Welding Cables: Breakdown

There's a higher class of welding cables that provides additional protection for welders - these cost more than regular welding cables. The premium cable

tends to have thinner stranding and a more durable jacket, with performance in temperatures ranging from -50°C up to 90°C.

· Average price of premium 6 AWG welding cable: $1.1 per foot.

· Average price of premium 4 AWG welding cable: $1.5 per foot.

· Average price of premium 2 AWG welding cable: $2.2 per foot.

· Average price of premium 1 AWG welding cable: $3 per foot.

· Average price of premium 1/0 AWG welding cable: $3.2 per foot.

· Average price of premium 2/0 AWG welding cable: $4 per foot.

· Average price of premium 3/0 AWG welding cable: $4.5 per foot.

· Average price of premium 4/0 AWG welding cable: $6.2 per foot.

 

Top 6 Features That Affect The Price Of Welding Cables

 

The following is a list of the top 6 features that might affect the price of the welding cable:

1) Amperage: The amperage is the maximum limit of current that can pass through the welding cable safely. The cables can usually handle current above that limit, but only for a temporary amount of time.

2) Cable size. The size of the welding cable is the main factor that impacts the price. The cable has to be long enough that you can reach every corner of the area you plan to weld in. A welder needs at least 2 welding cables: One cable to connect the welder to the electrode and another to connect it to the piece being welded (known as the 'work-piece').

3) Gauge: The gauge helps compensate for the length due to the fact that longer cables tend to lose on amperage. If you have a long cable, you're going to need a thicker size to keep the amperage consistent.

4) Jacket. The protective jacket of the welding cable or the "insulation" protects the cable from the elements. The most common protective materials for welding cables are PVC, EPDM, and neoprene. All of these materials insulate the cable from heavy temperature, water, abrasion, and more.

5) Flexibility: If the cable has a higher copper strand count, it's going to be more flexible and easy to bend. This is one of the main advantages of welding cables.

6) Color options: The manufacturer may provide different insulation colors in order to help you differentiate among the cables in your workshop.

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